40

U2 - 40 LYRICS:

I waited patiently for the Lord
He inclined and heard my cry
He brought me up out of the pit
Out of the miry clay

I will sing, sing a new song
I will sing, sing a new song

How long to sing this song?
How long to sing this song?
How long...how long...how long...
How long...to sing this song

He set my feet upon a rock
And made my footsteps firm
Many will see
Many will see and fear

I will sing, sing a new song
I will sing, sing a new song
I will sing, sing a new song
I will sing, sing a new song

How long to sing this song?
How long to sing this song?
How long...how long...how long...

Feeling human

I was mentioning to Charlene that I am enjoying this phase of life. The kids are old enough to be more fun than demanding, yet they're not old enough to be trouble. I am still young enough to sleep through the night, and I am getting more comfortable in my own skin, and emerging (sorry) from a period of restlessness. There are lots of good things happening, I have lots of good friends, and I sense God at work. But I am also feeling mortal. Jordon is sick. My sister-in-law's mother just died. My friend's 20-year-old son just died - went to the funeral home today, and it broke my heart. And while I wouldn't want to go back, I sense that life is passing by faster than I'd like. "Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom" (Psalm 90:12). I'm learning to number, and learning not to take any of them for granted.

Winning hearts, not twisting arms

Some more thoughts on Christians values and culture, this time from Charles Colson in the February 2006 Christianity Today. I love the subtitle, "Changing the law isn't enough."

To change the culture, therefore, we must learn how to engage the political process more winsomely. It will require a different mindset. We'll need to recognize that we're appealing to hearts and minds, not twisting arms. In fact as well as in appearance, we are not seeking to impose, but rather to propose. We're not demanding something for ourselves; we are inviting a hungry and needy world to come to Christ and find goodness and fullness of life. The Christian church makes a Great Proposal, inviting everyone to the table—regardless of ethnic origin, background, or economic status. We're inviting people to consider a worldview that's livable, that makes sense, in which people can discover shalom and human flourishing.

This means, first, loving those we contend against in the political process. Martin Luther King Jr. said, "Whom you would change, you must first love."

Coming to a labyrinth near you

A rant Mark Driscoll in response to Brian McLaren, that ends with these words::

Lastly, for the next 5-10 years you are hereby required to white 1 Peter 3:15 which says "But in your hearts set apart Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect" out of your Bible until further notice from McLaren because the religious right forget the gentleness and respect part and the religious left forgot the answer the question part. Subsequently, a task force will be commissioned to have a conversation about all of this at a labyrinth to be named later. Once consensus is reached a finger painting will be commissioned on the Emergent web site as the official doctrinal position.

I'm left quite speechless by Driscoll's rant, although I have wondered in the past why McLaren hasn't tackled this tough issue as readily and graciously as he has others.

Update: The post has been edited, and some comments deleted, but the original lives on here.