DashHouse.com

The Blog of Darryl Dash

This blog is about how Jesus changes everything. He changes:

Our relationship with God

Our relationship with others

Our vocations - how we live and work in this world

Our ministries

This blog exists to explore some of the ways that Jesus changes everything. It provides resources and articles that will help you think about the ways that Jesus can change every part of your life.

The Lord himself invites you to a conference concerning your immediate and endless happiness, and He would not have done this if He did not mean well toward you. Do not refuse the Lord Jesus who knocks at your door; for He knocks with a hand which was nailed to the tree for such as you are. Since His only and sole object is your good, incline your ear and come to Him. Hearken diligently, and let the good word sink into your soul. (C.H. Spurgeon, All of Grace)

Tested (Luke 22:39-46)

Today I'd like to talk to you about something that's a little difficult. I'd like to talk to you about testing.

I want to begin in Ikea. Right away I know that some of you men think you know where I'm going with this. You think that I'm saying that going to Ikea is a test. Yes, it is a test. If you can go to Ikea with your wife and shop for an hour or so and not get in a fight, then I congratulate you. You have a very healthy marriage. You should actually consider leading a seminar on how to maintain a healthy marriage. I take my hat off to you.

But that's not quite what I want to talk about. In Ikea they have a chair. The chair is like a lot of Ikea stuff: layers of wood glued and pressed together. They want to show you how strong this chair is, so they have a testing machine that pushes a 220 pound weight on the seat, and a 70 pound weight on the back, 50,000 times.

Or take the CN Tower. Years ago my wife and I went to the restaurant up there for our anniversary. Afterwards we went to the observation deck. If you've been there, you know that they have a glass floor 1,100 feet off the ground. It was a bitterly cold night, and I swear that the floor creaked when I stepped on it. Granted, I had just finished eating dinner, but it wasn't the sound that I wanted to hear. I did some research and discovered that it's five times stronger than the required weight-bearing standard for commercial floors. If 14 large hippos could fit in the elevator and get up to the observation deck, the glass floor could withstand their weight. And yet it creaked when I stood on it. Go figure.

Every day of our lives we encounter roads and seats and bridges and floors that have been tested to bear a certain load. And we should be grateful that this is the case. I'd hate to find out the hard way that a bridge wasn't engineered to hold the weight of the car that I'm driving.

But this morning I want to talk to you about the spiritual weight load. How much are you engineered to carry? This is an important question, because you're going to be tested. I know, because we've been in a period of testing recently ourselves. Some of you have been too.

For some of you, the test is going to be like the Ikea chair. It's not going to be a heavy weight, but it's going to be a repetitive one. Push, push, push, 50,000 times. It's not the heaviness of the testing, it's the persistence of the test that is going to leave you feeling like it's been enough.

For others of you, it's going to be like the 14 large hippos jumping on a piece of glass. It's going to be the weight of the testing. I've been reading a book called Wednesdays were Pretty Normal: A Boy, Cancer, And God. It's about a two-year-old boy who came down with cancer. That's a heavy test. For some it's not the repetition; it's the weight of a trial like this that can overwhelm you.

So I'd like to look at a story in Scripture about testing today. It's found in Luke 22. Let me set the scene for you. It's the night before Jesus is taken to the cross. Jesus knows that he is about to be betrayed and arrested. This is an intense period of testing for both Jesus and the disciples. We know this, because Jesus begins and ends this passage by saying to his disciples, "Pray that you may not enter into temptation" (Luke 22:40, 46). The word there is a word that's used for testing, for discovering the nature of someone or something. Jesus and the disciples are going through a severe period of testing together, and he emphasizes the need to pray during this period of severe trial.

This is a watershed moment. This is when we find out what Jesus and the disciples are made of. The consequences are huge at this moment. A lot is at stake. If Jesus doesn't pass this test, everything falls apart. What we're seeing in the garden is huge.

So here's the question. What do we learn about Jesus and about us when we enter a time of testing? Two things.

First: We learn that we can't pass the test.

In this passage we first learn something important about ourselves. This is very important information. This is make or break stuff here. It's critical to learn this, because if you don't you will live your entire life under an illusion. It's an illusion that has the power to crush and destroy you. So let's look at what we learn about ourselves in this passage.

Look at verses 39 and 40 with me:

And he came out and went, as was his custom, to the Mount of Olives, and the disciples followed him. And when he came to the place, he said to them, “Pray that you may not enter into temptation.”

Do you ever ask someone to do one relatively simple thing, realizing that it may be difficult to do more than that, but one should be manageable? Parents, do you ever ask your kids to clear the table when you go out? Then you come home and the table's full of dirty plates and food that you have to throw out. Or at work you delegate one thing to someone else while you cover the rest, and you come back and it's not done at all.

In this passage Jesus gives the disciples one thing to do, and it's not even that hard. They're under tremendous stress. Jesus has told them that he's going to be betrayed by one of them. He's turned to Peter and told him that he, Peter, is going to deny him. They know that tensions are swirling. And Jesus tells them that he wants them to do just one thing: to pray. It's not even that hard. He gives them an easy prayer too: Pray that they won't enter into temptation. Pray that they won't be tested. Jesus is essentially telling them, "Look, do just one thing. We're entering into the crucible of testing. Would you please pray that you will be spared from more testing. I have to go through this, but pray that you'll be spared." It's amazingly easy. It's like asking to be exempted from an exam at school. Jesus tells them to do one thing, and that's to pray that they get out of the time of testing.

But look what happens. Read verses 45 and 46:

And when he rose from prayer, he came to the disciples and found them sleeping for sorrow, and he said to them, “Why are you sleeping? Rise and pray that you may not enter into temptation.”

Notice two things here. One, they flunk. Jesus gives them one thing to do, and they fail. This is the watershed moment, the climatic point in the Gospel of Luke so far, and they're asleep. Not their finest moment. Translation: they have revealed what they are able to handle under testing, and it's not very much.

But notice something else. Notice that they get off relatively unscathed. For one thing, Luke kind of gives them an excuse. He says they were "sleeping from sorrow." Luke seems almost sympathetic in reporting what happened. Even Jesus goes pretty easy on them. He gives them a mild rebuke, but he's much more restrained than I would be.

You see, Jesus and the disciples were entering the crucible of testing. They were about to discover what they're made of. And what we learn about the disciples is important, because what's true of the disciples is true of us as well. Here's what he learn: We don't stand up very well under testing. We generally fail the test. You push us 50,000 times, and we'll probably snap at some point. You put us under the weight of a huge test, and we probably won't do very well. Here's what we learn in this passage: We are incapable of passing the test on our own.

This is so important because, frankly, a lot of us are trying. And we're continually disappointed that we don't. I'm reading a book by Steve Brown these days. He tells the story about a man named Clarence who had a frog named Felix. Clarence worked at WalMart, but he had dreams of getting rich, so he decided he would teach Felix the frog to fly. Who wouldn't pay to see a flying frog?

The frog wasn't that excited. "I can't fly, you twit. I'm a frog, not a canary!"

Clarence wasn't impressed. "That negative attitude of yours could be a real problem. We're going to remain poor, and it will be your fault."

So they got to work. Clarence explained that their building had fifteen floors, and that each day Felix would jump out of a window, starting with the first floor and eventually getting to the top floor. After each jump, they would analyze what worked well and tweak the process in preparation for the next floor.

Felix tried his best, but things didn't go to well. THUD! He tried different strategies, and even tried a cape, but the result was the same. THUD! On the seventh day, the frog said, "You know you're killing me, don't you?" And that day Felix the frog took one final leap and went to the great lily pad in the sky.

Steve Brown, who tells this story, was once a pastor. After relating to the story, listen to what he said:

A number of years ago, I realized that I was, as it were, trying to teach frogs to fly. Frogs can't fly. Not only that, but they get angry when you try to teach them. The gullible ones will try, but they eventually get hurt so bad, even they quit trying. And let me tell you a secret: the really sad thing about being a "frog flying teacher" is that I can't fly either.

Do you hear that? Steve Brown is telling us the same thing that this passage is telling us. We cannot pass the test. No matter how hard we try, no matter how much effort we make, when tested, we are found wanting. Church is not a good person telling good people how to be good, as Mark Twain put it. Church this morning is a broken person person telling broken people that they're broken. We flunk the test! We get a glimpse of ourselves in this passage, and it's important for us to see this, because it will save us a lifetime of trying to fly out windows when we were never made to fly.

This passage reveals what happens to us when we're tested. We cannot pass the test.

But that's not the whole story. We've seen what's true of us: We can't pass the test. But then:

Second, see that Jesus was severely tested, and that that he passed the test.

Read verses 41-44 with me:

And he withdrew from them about a stone's throw, and knelt down and prayed, saying, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me. Nevertheless, not my will, but yours, be done.” And there appeared to him an angel from heaven, strengthening him. And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly; and his sweat became like great drops of blood falling down to the ground.

Do you realize the severity of the test that Jesus was going through? First, he was abandoned. His closest friends were standing apart from him asleep, and he was alone, completely alone, to face the greatest trial of his life.

Not only was he abandoned, but he realized what he was about to face. He prays about the cup of suffering that he was about to taste. The cup in Scripture is used to refer to God's wrath.

Jesus was facing something that nobody else in history has ever faced. From eternity he had enjoyed perfect communion with the Father, a relationship of absolute intimacy and love. But at the cross Jesus was for the first time cut off from his Father. At the cross Jesus would take on our sin and bear the wrath of God. In the Garden of Gethsemane, he experienced a bit of that and it put him into shock.

New Testament scholar Bill Lane writes, "Jesus came to be with the Father for an interlude before his betrayal, but found hell rather than heaven opened before him, and he staggered."

Centuries ago Jonathan Edwards said:

The thing that Christ's mind was so full of at that time was...the dread which his feeble human nature had of that dreadful cup, which was vastly more terrible than Nebuchadnezzar's fiery furnace. He had then a near view of that furnace of wrath, into which he was to be cast; he was brought to the mouth of the furnace that he might look into it, and stand and view its raging flames, and see the glowings of its heat, that he might know where he was going and what he was about to suffer. This was the thing that filled his soul with sorrow and darkness, this terrible sight as it were overwhelmed him...None of God's children ever had such a cup set before them, as this first being of every creature had.

In the Garden, Jesus had a foretaste of what it would be like to be abandoned by God, the relationship that was infinitely more intimate and valuable than any relationship we could lose. If Jesus hadn't have been abandoned by God like this, we would have to be. It was either him or us.

In the dark, when nobody else was looking, he experienced the abandonment of his friends, he also began also to experience the cup of God's abandonment of him, the full weight of the wrath of God that weighed upon him.

Notice how he struggled under that load. In fact, an angel was sent to strengthen him, but it only led to greater intensity and struggle in his prayer. This is the peak of Jesus' struggle. After this you never get any sense of internal struggle in Jesus as he's arrested and tried and as he goes to the cross. But here he struggles. He's tested, and the struggle is intense, far more intense than what the disciples went through.

And notice: Jesus passes the test. It's like the disciples go through a minor test and they fail. And Jesus goes through the most intense test that anyone in history has endured. It's so intense that even Jesus receives strengthening. But he passes the test. He asks if there is another way, but he submits to his Father's will and moves forward in obedience.

Here's what Luke is telling us: Where we fail, Jesus succeeds. Where we fail the test, Jesus passed. Despite the fact that Jesus is tested far more severely than the disciples, he passes the test, and the disciples don't.

But wait. There's one more thing we need to look at. Why does Jesus tell them to pray, “Pray that you may not enter into temptation"? This was bothering me as I thought about it this week. Jesus didn't tell them to pray that they would be able to stand up to the time of testing. He asked them to pray that they would escape the time of testing.

As I was wrestling through this, it finally came to me: Jesus knew that they couldn't pass the test. Jesus knew that they had no hope of standing up to the crucible of testing that he was going through. Jesus knew that he would be arrested, tried, and killed. This was his God-given vocation; this was what he was sent to do. He also knew that he would go alone into the hour and the power of darkness. He would go, but he would not take them down with him.

Then it hit me: Jesus knew that he was not only passing the test, but he was passing the test for them. You know that this passage is telling us? Jesus passed the test that we failed, but he did it so that we could pass even though we failed. On the cross, Jesus bore the weight of our failure. On the cross, Jesus passed the test on our behalf. His obedience was credited to our account, so that we passed through Jesus even though we failed.

Do you know what that means? It means that we don't need to become flying frogs to please God. It means we acknowledge that we cannot withstand the test on our own strength. But it also means that we can have complete confidence in the one who has already passed the test for us. "The Bible's purpose is not so much to show you how to live a good life. The Bible's purpose is to show you how God’s grace breaks into your life against your will and saves you from the sin and brokenness otherwise you would never be able to overcome" (Tim Keller).

On the same day, Rebecca Pippert attended two very different events: a graduate-level psychology class at Harvard University and a Christian Bible study adjacent to Harvard. She offered the following observations on how the two groups addressed (or failed to address) their faults, problems, and sins:

First, the students [in the graduate-level psychology class] were extraordinarily open and candid about their problems. It wasn't uncommon to hear them say, "I'm angry," "I'm afraid," "I'm jealous" …. Their admission of their problems was the opposite of denial. Second, their openness about their problems was matched only by their uncertainty about where to find resources to overcome them. Having confessed, for example, their inability to forgive someone who had hurt them, [they had no idea how to] resolve the problem by forgiving and being kind and generous instead of petty and vindictive.

One day after the class, I dropped in on a Bible study group in Cambridge. [The contrast] was striking. No one spoke openly about his or her problems. There was a lot of talk about God's answers and promises, but very little about the participants and the problems they faced. The closest thing to an admission [of sin or a personal problem] was a reference to someone who was "struggling and needs prayer."

"The first group [the psychology class] seemed to have all the problems and no answers; the second group [the Bible study] had all the answers and no problems."

Do you know what really happens when we understand what Jesus has done for us? We can be like the first group and be completely honest about our problems. But we can also have confidence because we realize our confidence isn't in ourselves, but in Jesus who passed on our behalf.

A minister used to tell his people, "Cheer up, you're worse than you think." Think about it. He was telling them to cheer up despite the fact that they're failing the test, because they don't have to pass anymore. Jesus has passed.

I was at the gym on Friday, and I noticed that the guy beside me had a t-shirt on that said, "Ernst and Young. I passed!" It made me want to get a t-shirt that said, "Jesus and me. I failed!" But then I'd have to add that Jesus passed the test that we failed, but he did it so that we could pass even though we failed.

Tim Keller often prays this prayer which captures it well: "Lord Jesus Christ, I admit that I am weaker and more sinful than I ever before believed, but, through you, I am more loved and accepted than I ever dared hope." I invite you to come this morning in your failure, in your weakness, in your brokenness, and admit all of this in complete honesty, and then to revel in the fact that you're loved anyway because of what Jesus endured when he passed the test on your behalf.

Why Plant Churches? (Romans 15:14-21)

I want to take you back to a recent evening in our lives that marked an ending for us, and a beginning. I want to take you there so I can ask you a question that was asked about us that night.

The night was January 15th. On that night we marked the end of almost 14 years of ministry at Richview Baptist Church in Toronto. We had one of our two kids while we were there. We had spent some of the best years of our lives while I pastored at Richview. On that evening we were saying goodbye to our church family. My library was in storage. I remember very clearly the feeling of leaving the keys on my desk and closing the door to my study for the very last time, knowing that the next morning I’d begin work on converting a room in my basement into my new study.

That evening, someone who loves us and who has appreciated our ministry asked an question about our plans to leave Richview and to begin a church plant. The question was asked quietly: Does Toronto really need another church? Another way of putting the question is this: Why bother with church planting when Toronto already has so many churches already?

It’s a great question. In fact, it’s a question that I’ve asked many times in the past as well. Toronto has so many churches that are plateaued or in decline. Why start a new church? Why not put a moratorium on church planting and just focus on revitalizing existing churches? Does Toronto really need a new church? It’s a great question, and there’s a great answer as well.

In the passage we have before us this morning, the apostle Paul is concluding his letter to the Roman church. His letter is one of the high points of theological insight within Scripture. As he gets to the end of his book, he tips his hand about the reason that he’s writing. After all, he didn’t start the church in Rome and he had never visited it. Paul gives the answer in this passage. In Romans 15:14-16 he says that he wants to remind them of what they already know, because he’s an apostle to the Gentiles, and they’re a predominantly Gentile church.

But then he begins talking about his church planting ministry. In this passage Paul gives us three reasons why church planting is so important. So this morning I want to simply do what Paul does in this passage. Let me give you three reasons why church planting is important, and then let me do what Paul does as well. Let me challenge you to see how you can play a role.

So let’s look at three reasons why we need to plant churches. And then let me tell you how you can be involved in one of the greatest ministries that we have before us at this time.

Why plant churches?

One: Plant churches as an act of worship.

Look at verses 14 to 16 with me:

I myself am satisfied about you, my brothers, that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge and able to instruct one another. But on some points I have written to you very boldly by way of reminder, because of the grace given me by God to be a minister of Christ Jesus to the Gentiles in the priestly service of the gospel of God, so that the offering of the Gentiles may be acceptable, sanctified by the Holy Spirit. (Romans 15:14-16)

There are many ways that you can think of church planting. Close your eyes and picture what comes to your mind when you think of a church planter. Here’s what I think of: a 20-something young guy with an edge and a Mac computer who likes to blog and hang out at coffee shops. That’s the image that many people have of a church planter. Or maybe you think of church planters that you know. I think of guys like my church planting friends Dan, Joe, Paul, and Tim. I don’t know what image you have of a church planter, but I will bet it’s not the image that Paul gives us here.

Here’s the image that Paul gives us. He gives us the image of a Jewish priest offering a sacrifice to God. But the priest isn’t offering an animal sacrifice or using a knife. Instead, Paul gives us a shocking image. He pictures the church planter as a priest using the gospel as the tool, and the new Gentile believers as the offering. Remember that Gentiles were forbidden to enter the temple. But here Gentiles are in the temple, and they’re being offered as an acceptable sacrifice because they have been made holy by the Holy Spirit. It’s a jarring image, and it’s worth chewing on for a long time I think.

Why plant churches? The first reason Paul gives us is a doxological one. We plant churches as an act of worship to God. We plant churches because we want to fulfill our priestly ministry of offering to God people who were far away from him, but who have been sanctified by the Holy Spirit and who are now acceptable sacrifices of worship to him. Church planting is an act of worship. It’s like what John Piper said, if I could adapt what he’s said:

[Church planting] is not the ultimate goal of the Church. Worship is. [Church planting] exists because worship doesn’t. Worship is ultimate, not [church planting], because God is ultimate, not man. When this age is over, and the countless millions of the redeemed fall on their faces before the throne of God, [church planting] will be no more. It is a temporary necessity. But worship abides forever.

Worship, therefore, is the fuel and goal of [church planting]. It’s the goal of [church planting] because in [church planting] we simply aim to bring the nations into the white hot enjoyment of God’s glory. The goal of [church planting] is the gladness of the peoples in the greatness of God. “The Lord reigns; let the earth rejoice; let the many coastlands be glad!” (Ps 97:1). “Let the peoples praise thee, O God; let all the peoples praise thee! Let the nations be glad and sing for joy!” (Ps 67:3-4).

But worship is also the fuel of [church planting]. Passion for God in worship precedes the offer of God in preaching. You can’t commend what you don’t cherish. Missionaries will never call out, “Let the nations be glad!” who cannot say from the heart, “I rejoice in the Lord…I will be glad and exult in thee, I will sing praise to thy name, O Most High” (Ps 104:34, 9:2). [Church planting] begins and ends in worship.

We have our eyes on a neighborhood in Toronto. And I own a Mac and I’ll probably hang out in coffee shops in that area, and I may even work on my blog. But the image that I have in my mind as I move into that area is that of a priest. I want to go in as a priest in that area and offer God an offering of people who have been transformed by the gospel and the Holy Spirit. That’s the first reason why church planting is so important. It’s an act of worship to God. It’s so that we can offer the sacrifice of transformed lives to God in worship.

But there’s a second reason why we should church plant:

Two: Church planting is strategic.

Read what Paul says in verses 17 to 19:

In Christ Jesus, then, I have reason to be proud of my work for God. For I will not venture to speak of anything except what Christ has accomplished through me to bring the Gentiles to obedience—by word and deed, by the power of signs and wonders, by the power of the Spirit of God—so that from Jerusalem and all the way around to Illyricum I have fulfilled the ministry of the gospel of Christ… (Romans 15:17-19 ESV)

Paul seems a little confident in this passage. We’re not used to hearing somebody talk about being proud of their work for God. And in verse 19 Paul makes an audacious claim: that he’s fulfilled his ministry by planting churches in a circle or arc from Jerusalem all the way to Illyricum. This is a huge area, from Jerusalem all the way to what we would call Albania today. It’s just northeast of Italy. We read later on that Paul is even planning to branch out further to Spain. Paul says that he’s fulfilled his ministry throughout this vast area. How is this even possible? There were only a small number of churches.

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Here’s what I think Paul means. He means that churches had been planted in key population centers so that those churches could carry out the work of evangelism themselves. Paul believed that by planting churches in cities, those churches would continue to grow and spread and influence the entire regions surrounding those cities. Paul’s own distinctive ministry of starting foundational and strategic churches had been fulfilled, and the name of Christ would soon be heard throughout its borders. This is exactly what happened. It reminds me of the pioneers. As soon as they were close enough to see the smoke rising from a neighbor’s house, they knew it was time to move on and populate a new area.

Tim Keller puts it this way:

Paul's whole strategy was to plant urban churches. The greatest missionary in history, St.Paul, had a rather simple, two-fold strategy. First, he went into the largest city of the region (cf. Acts 16:9,12), and second, he planted churches in each city (cf. Titus 1:5- "appoint elders in every town"). Once Paul had done that, he could say that he had 'fully preached' the gospel in a region and that he had 'no more work' to do there (cf. Romans 15:19,23). This means Paul had two controlling assumptions: a) that the way to most permanently influence a country was through its chief cities, and b) the way to most permanently influence a city was to plant churches in it. Once he had accomplished this in a city, he moved on. He knew that the rest that needed to happen would follow.

Keller concludes:

The vigorous, continual planting of new congregations is the single most crucial strategy for 1) the numerical growth of the Body of Christ in any city, and 2) the continual corporate renewal and revival of the existing churches in a city. Nothing else--not crusades, outreach programs, para-church ministries, growing mega-churches, congregational consulting, nor church renewal processes--will have the consistent impact of dynamic, extensive church planting.

If you want to see Ontario transformed, here’s what we need to do. We need to go to key urban centers like Toronto and plant churches. They’re like beachheads. It’s the most strategic thing we can do. And those church plants are not only going to have an influence on those cities. Like it or not, what happens in the city influences the entire region as a whole. And if churches are planted in places like Toronto, it’s going to have a strategic influence on a much larger area than we realize.

That’s why we need to church plant. Church planting is an act of worship, but it’s also strategic. It’s so strategic that Paul believed that churches planted in major population centers would be enough to spread the gospel in that entire region. That’s the second reason why church planting is so important.

Church planting is an act of worship. Church planting is strategic. There’s one more reason why church planting is important:

Three: Church planting is evangelistic.

Paul writes:

…and thus I make it my ambition to preach the gospel, not where Christ has already been named, lest I build on someone else's foundation, but as it is written,

“Those who have never been told of him will see,
and those who have never heard will understand.”
(Romans 15:20-21 ESV)

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Here’s a map of Toronto that has our current Fellowship churches. Notice that there are entire areas - particularly downtown - where we don’t have any churches. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t churches there. It must means that we don’t have any churches in those areas.

What struck me is that many of these areas are ones that are exploding with growth. The population of Toronto has grown by 9% in the last five years. Condos are springing up all over the place in locations where we just don’t have any churches. Paul said it was his ambition to preach the gospel where it hasn’t been preached. We have this opportunity right in Toronto.

The opportunity we have before us is one that goes back all the way to Isaiah 52:5. Paul quotes it in verse 21:

Those who have never been told of him will see,
and those who have never heard will understand.

Why church plant? Because I have the opportunity of participating in something that started a long time ago. Those who have not yet been told of the Lord must know. People who have never heard the gospel must understand. Church planting is a means of evangelizing areas where Christ is not yet named, and that includes huge parts of Toronto.

Charles Simeon said:

Who that knows the value of his own soul, must not pant after the salvation of the souls of others? And who, that knows his obligations to God, must not long to serve God in a way so acceptable to his mind, and so conducive to his glory? Let me not, then, call you to this work in vain. If there be any who are by education and by grace fitted for personal exertion in that field of labour, let him, like the Prophet, stand forth, and say, “Here am I: send me.” If it be only in a subordinate manner that you are able to assist in this good cause, still let it be seen that your heart is in it, and your labour according to the full extent of your ability. In your contributions, be liberal after your power: and in whatever way you can be useful, “give yourselves to the work” with cheerfulness, and persevere in it with diligence. Certainly, if ever united exertions were called for, it is now, when God is so evidently prospering the work, and putting honour on those who are engaged in it — — — “Come then, all of you, to the help of the Lord:” and “whatever your hand findeth to do, do it with all your might.”

So that, Paul says, is why he’s a church planter. He’s a church planter because church planting is an act of worship. He’s a church planter because church planting is strategic. And he’s a church planter because church planting is evangelistic.

But then Paul does what I have to do as well. Paul enlists the Romans and enlists their help in what he’s doing. He says in verse 24: “I hope to see you in passing as I go to Spain, and to be helped on my journey there by you, once I have enjoyed your company for a while” (Romans 15:24). And he asks them to pray for him as well. Douglas Moo says, “Paul here hints at one of his main purposes in writing Romans: the need to get help from the Romans for his projected Spanish mission.” He wants Rome to be the base of his support for his mission in Rome.

You see, although Paul has planted churches all throughout the Eastern Mediterranean, he’s not done yet. He still wants to go even farther, to far edge of the Mediterranean, and spread the gospel there as well. Paul’s not done planting churches as long as there are still more population centers that need the gospel.

You see, church planting is about more than a church planter. You need people praying. You need bases of support. You need all kinds of people taking all kinds of roles.

I saw this picture recently:

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Deck Hands Needed

Live Aboard
Low Pay
Long Hours
Good Food

Permanent Crew Space Available
Opportunity of a Lifetime

It reminded me of the quote from Sir Ernest Shackleton, from the advertisement he used when recruiting men for his expedition to Antarctica in 1914:

Men wanted for hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in case of success.

That’s the adventure of church planting. It’s worth it because it’s an act of worship, and because it’s strategic and evangelistic. And it’s why you should consider partnering in planting churches as well.