DashHouse.com

The Blog of Darryl Dash

This blog is about how Jesus changes everything. He changes:

Our relationship with God

Our relationship with others

Our vocations - how we live and work in this world

Our ministries

This blog exists to explore some of the ways that Jesus changes everything. It provides resources and articles that will help you think about the ways that Jesus can change every part of your life.

The Lord himself invites you to a conference concerning your immediate and endless happiness, and He would not have done this if He did not mean well toward you. Do not refuse the Lord Jesus who knocks at your door; for He knocks with a hand which was nailed to the tree for such as you are. Since His only and sole object is your good, incline your ear and come to Him. Hearken diligently, and let the good word sink into your soul. (C.H. Spurgeon, All of Grace)

Review: Logos Sermon Finder

Just a few years ago, many of Tim Keller’s sermon manuscripts were all on paper. He talked about this in a sermon in 1994:

In my life, I have about a thousand sermons I wrote from about 1975 to 1985 that are all written on paper, hard copy. They’re not on any disk. They’re all there. That’s it. I spent 10 to 20 hours on each one of those things, and they’re all in one basic long file drawer. I look at that and I shudder sometimes. I say, “What would happen?”

They may still be sitting there in a drawer somewhere, but things have changed. I know have over 1,200 of his sermons in my Logos library, as well as 1,300 of John Piper’s sermons, not to mention hundreds of sermons by Charles Spurgeon and now Greg Laurie.

Here’s what’s good about this: I have an embarrassment of riches with me everywhere I go, as long as I have my phone, tablet, or computer with me. As I prepared my sermon for tonight, I was able to study the text, read many of the best commentaries, and then check out what great preachers did with the text. I can search within the sermon archives I own, or browse them by date, series, or by Scripture reference. For instance, check out some of Greg Laurie’s sermons on Philippians:

I don’t know Laurie that well, and his preaching style is probably different from mine, but that is a good thing. I appreciate seeing what someone who is different than me did with the text.

Logos does a great job of explaining how it works at their site.

It’s easy to access sermons by passage.

  1. Open Guides > Passage Guide.
  2. Enter a Passage in the Reference Box — e.g. James 1
  3. Scroll down to the "Sermons" section. You may need to click the triangle to expand it.
  4. Click on any blue sermon title to open the associated sermon entry.

Each sermon title will display the passage it covers and some may include the date when they were preached. Here's what it looks like for the passage I preached last weekend:

passageguide.gif

Any good thing can be abused. I never want to begin a sermon my reading how others preached the text. Nothing can replace the preacher’s own wrestling with the text before turning to commentaries and the sermons of others. Also, it’s never a good  to preach someone else’s sermon as your own. At some point in the process, however, it does help to see how other capable preachers have handled the text. It can spark ideas and sharpen the sermons that we are about to preach.

There’s value, too, in having these sermons in Logos. I feel like I’m just scratching the surface of what this program is able to do, but I can’t imagine doing without it.

Getting the job done requires that we have the right tools. Logos is a tool I’ve come to love. If you are a preacher or a serious student of the Bible, I encourage you to take a look at the sermon archives that they have available.

Find out more about the Logos Sermon Finder page here.

Thanks to Logos for giving me a copy of Greg Laurie’s sermon archives to review.

Saturday Links

Links for your weekend reading:

Instead of Building Your Platform, Build Your Character

You build your character, and let God build your platform and influence.

6 Nuggets of Wisdom for Leaders

Here are a few other nuggets of wisdom I have received from others who have greatly influenced my leadership.

5 New Habits to Help Church Leaders Do More in Less Time

Here are a few areas that would be worth considering to increase your output for the rest of your year.

A Word to the Introverted Pastor: Be Extroverted on Sunday

If you asked most people in the churches where I have served as pastor, other than those who know me really well, they are surprised I am an introvert based on my Sunday interactions with people. I’m very extroverted on Sundays.

So how do I do it?

Why Pastors Should Preach About Body Image

Body image is not a fringe issue. It is without a doubt ravaging members of the church in both visible and invisible ways. That's why I hope pastors will end the silence.

Six Ways Your Phone Is Changing You

What is life like now because of the smartphone? How has the iPhone changed us? These self-reflective questions may seem daunting, but we must ask them.

The Most Important Hour of Your Life

Life today is fast and full of opportunity. The complication is we think we have to do everything. The implication of this is we end up being pulled into endless distractions without pausing to really think.

Saturday Links

Links for your weekend reading:

Theology, the Last Resort

It is troubling that we often become more biblical when the difficult realities of life occur, our possessions are removed, and the comfort is gone. We get theologically serious.

What would happen if we allowed biblical doctrine to guide our lives each day, everyday?

The Great Commission Means Sharing Christ's Story, Not Yours

Gospel presentations that include personal testimonies should take care to emphasize the gospel itself (the news of Christ’s death and resurrection), not merely our personal experiences of life transformation.

An Open Letter to "Gospel-Centered" Preachers

I’m not saying don’t preach Jesus from every text – do. But we oughtn’t to treat Jesus revelation of himself “in all the scriptures, beginning with Moses and the prophets” as a kind of epistemological cereal box decoder ring.

Why Pastors Should Go On More Walks

The simple step to boosting your creativity is simply taking simple steps.

Comfort for Christian Parents of Unconverted Children

Although salvation is the work of God and not something that we can do for our child, there is hope. Consider the following...

What Church Plants Have that Established Churches (Often) Don't

Church plants have very little. They have little money, few people, no building, and an uncertain future. Yet church plants have a few things that older churches often don't have, and that makes all the difference.

What do church plants have? Three qualities:

  • A unified vision — Mission drift plagues many established churches. New churches typically don't succumb to this, at least in the early years. If you are in a church plant, it's likely because you've heard the vision and bought into it. Otherwise, there's little to keep you there. This is a huge advantage.
  • An outward focus — Churches tend to turn inward as they grow older. A church plant can't afford to do this, or they will not get off the ground. New churches have a focus on evangelism and blessing the community that is essential.
  • A flexible ministry model — Having little can work to your advantage. You can make changes without having to reinvent everything. Newer churches can change almost anything at a moment's notice. They are not constrained by buildings and years of tradition. New churches are nimble.

Please note: it's possible to have all of the above in an established church, but not without a lot of work. By work, I mean suffering. Established churches have more stability and resources, but these often come at the expense of the qualities I describe above.

Here's the beautiful thing: newer churches can help older churches move towards these qualities, as older churches help newer churches with prayer and resources. Both newer churches and older churches have what the other needs. Both are essential in the Kingdom.

Saturday Links

Links for your weekend reading:

Millennials Need a Bigger God, Not a Hipper Pastor

When we tell them they’re special, we’re merely echoing what educators, coaches, and parents have told them their whole lives. But when we present a ravishing vision of a loving and holy God, it just might get their attention and capture their hearts as well.

Putting Your City in Its Place

When we know that place matters, that all nations live on the ground somewhere, it keeps us from the nebulous goal of trying to reach everybody on our own, and most importantly, it hones our focus on reaching somebody.

Seven Ways to Love Your Pastor

Pastor Paul shared seven ways that a congregation can love their shepherd, and his words of encouragement are applicable to every local church context.

Six Symptoms of a Dysfunctional Church

In my quest, I found six recurring themes. In every one of the congregations, the church manifested at least three of these symptoms.

Faith and Mental Illness

There will always be a central place for spiritual care—especially the faithful ministry of preaching, teaching, sacraments, prayer, and discipline. But, like a kid with a broken leg, getting people to the "emergency room" may be the first order of business.

5 Tips to Keep Email from Ruining Your Life

There’s no magic button that can reduce your email flood to a trickle. But by eliminating the unimportant junk, minimizing the back-and-forths, and using helper software, you can go a long way toward making the deluge manageable.